Up In Flames – part 2

About three and a half years ago I wrote the article: ‘Up In Flames’ that can be found at Psychealth.com. It was written shortly after my apartment burned down and shares my experience navigating through that challenging life event. This article is the follow-up.

It took over three years to rebuild my home. I recall the first few weeks as the most difficult, as I was coming to terms with the scope of the loss. As time went on, I discovered lots of silver linings: I got to experience a new community to live in, I got to live in a place with a superb view, and I got to enhance various relationships/connections that led to many memorable experiences. Not having content insurance posed some challenges but slowly but surely i rebuilt my collection of clothes and unique items, with the help and generosity of my family, friends and colleagues. I often say that my place burning down was the best thing to ever happen to me since it sent my life on a new and fruitful trajectory.

The day before I got the keys to my apartment the anticipation and excitement was stifled: I got word that our family cabin outside of Pemberton had burned down. It was likely an electrical fire; the flames destroyed the house, the surrounding outbuildings on our property, and about an acre of forest next door to our property. I experienced a juxtapostion of feelings; there was gratitude and relief that no one was hurt and the flames didn’t spread to our neighbours’ cabins but the shock and uncertainty was dilapidating as i along with each family member tried to grapple with the situation. We had owned the cabin for just under a year but the connection we had to the place was strong and the sense of loss was significant.

As the days went on, I realized that my experience three years ago helped prepare me for this situation as I began to pivot my mind and explore the positives, shifting my focus to the future. I quickly realized though that my family wasn’t on the same page with me and required more time to process the experience. It once again emphasized how critical it is to talk about challenging situations or write or express the feelings in some creative way. Doing so helps settle the emotions down. It enabled me to be there for them, the way they were there for me three years ago. There was nothing specific or special I said while connecting with my family; I just focused and listened. I provided some feedback, based on my prior experience, when the situation warranted it or when input was invited. As the weeks have passed, the sadness has slowly subsided as I have observed each family member slowly making a shift in their minds towards the future.

A few ideas to assist with challenging moments such as this:

  1. Take the time to process it. Allocate 20 to 30 minutes a day to chat or write. Look at photos; share stories and memories; focus on the way you are feeling.
  2. make self-care a priority. Get out for a walk, have a good meal, spend time with friends, watch a movie, do some mindfulness, etc.
  3. Focus on the next steps. what needs to be done to rebuild or get your life back on track?
  4. Start to explore and highlight the silvers linings. There are always positives! Focus on the moments you are grateful for, no matter how small they may seem.
  5. If the intense thoughts and feelings persist, seek professional support. How someone reacts to a situation is impacted by his/her perception or beliefs which are developed from biology, genetics, temperament and experiential factors.

I look forward to a year or so down the road when my family feels he excitement I feel right now moving back into my apartment. It’s brand new, feels more sturdy, has better sound proofing, and everything has been upgraded to today’s codes and standards. I have realized first hand that challenges can enhance resiliency. As Viktor Frankl suggested, it’s through those challenges we can find meaning and purpose

Up In Flames – part 2
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Chris is a Registered Clinical Counsellor who provides support to youth and adults experiencing anxiety, depression, anger, PTSD, grief and substance use. As a therapist, his ultimate goal is to help clients enhance resiliency in their lives. He sets out to accomplish this by engaging in a collaborative and strength-based approach. He incorporates several different modalities and strategies based odn each client’s unique situation and preference, including cognitive behavioural therapy and EMDR.

Chris completed a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Simon Fraser University and a Master of Arts in counselling psychology from Yorkville University. Prior to working in private practice, Chris’ professional journey took him to community agency, school and government programs as he had the privilege to work with an eclectic group of clients. In 2008 he collaborated with three fellow therapists and a team of programmers to create an online wellness boosting program called the Mental Health Boot Camp

Psychology aside Chris is the co-founder of the Original Ugly Christmas Sweater, an annual charity event in Vancouver that is credited with starting the ‘ugly Christmas sweater’ trend that has spanned the globe. His latest project has been to co-author a children’s book called: The Ugly Christmas Sweater Rebellion. Chris is a member of the Rotary Club of Coquitlam and is the co-vice president of the alumni association at his old high school, St.Thomas More Collegiate.

Chris provides presentations to the general public as well as educators and other mental health professionals. he is currently offering 3 presentation topics: ‘Wellness 101’, ‘Anxiety: Our Super Power!’, and ‘How to Use Pop Culture for Positive Change.’

Website: www.chrisboydcounselling.com

Instagram: @mentalhealthbootcamp, @uglychristmassweaterbook

Podcast: The Mental Health Boot Camp Podcast

 

 

Posted in Depression, Family & Parenting, General, Grief, Marriage & Relationships, Personal Growth, Stress & Anxiety, Therapy