Author: Maureen Chapman

Maureen offers an environment in which rapport, safety, empathy and trust are instilled to assist her clients in addressing their personal life challenges.

Her areas of interest include depression, anxiety, communication breakdown, assertiveness skills, self-esteem, personal growth, family of origin issues, health anxiety and the development of emotional intimacy. She has a special interest in assisting individuals and families impacted by emotional dysregulation, high sensitivity, introversion, narcissim and borderline personality traits.

Maureen’s therapeutic approach is eclectic and dependent on the client’s situation and goals. Techniques may include Cognitive Behavioural, modified Dialectical Behavioural, Emotionally Focused, Systems, and Adlerian therapy.

Prior to obtaining her Master of Arts in Counselling Psychology from the Adler School of Professional Psychology in Chicago, Maureen was a research assistant with the U.B.C. Mood DIsorders Clinic and a volunteer with the RCMP Victim Services.

Maureen is married with 3 adult children.

Maureen is also a member of the British Columbia Association of Clinical Counsellors and the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association.

The Gifts of Introversion (or being quiet)

Very few people are completely extroverted or introverted, but for those who are closer to the introverted end of the spectrum, please read on.  Extroversion has been seen as the ideal personality type. What we are now recognizing is that introversion is also a normal variation of personality. Research shows that the brains of introverts are more active than those of extroverts. This explains why introverts limit how much comes in, while extroverts go where the action is.  In brief, these mostly

Posted in General

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Sam came in highly nervous to attend his first therapy session. He was distressed and stated his doctor wanted him to have Cognitive Behavioral Therapy  (CBT) for his depression, anger, and  anxiety.  Sam feverently  added, “I don’t have a million dollars to spend on therapy and don’t want to be in here for the rest of my life.” Sam was informed that CBT is a form of psychotherapy that emphasizes the important role of thinking about how we feel and

Posted in Depression, Personal Growth, Stress & Anxiety, Therapy

Health Anxiety

People with health anxiety focus on specific sensations such as feeling dizzy, fatigue, joint pain,  digestive problems, a headache or a quick and sudden heartbeat.  Such physiological symptoms are typically not harmful if they are short lived and do not re-occur on a repeated basis. The difficulty that people with health anxiety have is that they misattribute these symptoms as indicating there MUST be significant disease lurking. Like many people, they will make an appointment with their doctor to have these symptoms

Posted in Stress & Anxiety Tagged with: , , , , ,

Bipolar Disorder

Since Alexis was about 16 she had bouts with depression, irritability, doing poorly in school, crying and isolating herself. After awhile she seemed to get better, and started to engage with people, becoming the life of the party, talking a mile a minute. She would re-focus on her school work, stay up all night, and then CRASHHH. Down she would come again. These cycles would repeat themselves over the next 20 years. Alexis and her family were obviously deeply concerned

Posted in Depression Tagged with: ,

Emotional Intimacy

The idea of love has captured the imagination of humanity and has intrigued the hearts and minds of men and women since the beginning of time. Years ago I came across a couple who were moving towards divorce following 32 years of marriage. Both in their 50’s, the wife appeared sad and tired of living in what she believed was a loveless marriage. David was shocked that Diana could make the claim he had never loved her. His life dream

Posted in Marriage & Relationships

Destructive Narcissistic Parents – Part II

In the Summer of 2010 a published PsycHealth article on “Destructive Narcissistic Parents” triggered a number of calls from the adult offspring of these parents. They felt relieved in recognizing that they were not alone, nor were their parents who struggled with these traits. In therapy they were able to address the emotions they encountered during parental interactions. They learned to develop assertiveness, independence and healthy boundaries. Yet, something was missing. They described sadness, bitterness, and resentment at the wasted

Posted in Family & Parenting

Destructive Narcissistic Parents

Susan was asked to go to her parents’ home for dinner. After trying on four outfits, she fell into a heap on the bed crying. Mark, her husband, had seen this behavior before. Wrapping his arms around her he gently said “I know your parents are going to make a comment about your appearance or weight, no matter what you wear. We don’t have to go Susan, why do you keep torturing yourself?” Why indeed? As a grown woman she

Posted in Family & Parenting

Teens Who Cut

Maria is 14 years old. Two years ago she began to injure herself, dropped out of school, began using drugs and alcohol and eventually isolated all of her friends. Self injury involves the deliberate damaging of ones body. Cutting the skin with razor blades or broken glass is the most commonly seen method, while burning, interference with wound healing, self punching and scratching are among other examples. Maria notes that when her peers discovered she was cutting she was ridiculed

Posted in Depression, Stress & Anxiety

The Storm Within

Mary has suffered for years in her personal relationships and in her private world. Her behaviour, thoughts, and emotions were often described as though she was in the middle of a whirlwind. When meeting men she would put them on a pedestal, idealizing them to the point where they appeared to reach near sainthood in her eyes. Shortly after, she would seek out their flaws and vulnerabilities and go on the attack. She said it was like “I’m fire or

Posted in Personal Growth

Self Reflection: A Life Long Journey

As a therapist I am consistently reminded of my clients’ courage when they strive to pursue the goal of making positive changes in their lives. At times, we discover that how we see ourselves and how others see us are not always in sync. We may find that some areas we perceived as strengths can actually disable our growth and the growth of others. (ie: In caretaking others’ needs, we may lose sight of what we need to remain healthy,

Posted in Personal Growth